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Cabinet of the Confederate States of America

September 29, 2009

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JEFFERSON DAVIS, PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

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ALEXANDER STEPHENS, VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

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ROBERT TOOMBS, SECRETARY OF STATE.

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Hon. Robert Toombs was born in Wilkes county, Georgia, July 2, 1810.  Commencing his collegiate life at the University of Georgia, he subsequently went North, and graduated at Union College, Schenectady, New York. In 1836 he served as a captain of volunteers in the Creek war.  In the next year he was elected to the Legislature, and since that time has been constantly in public life as representative and United States Senator.

In the late movement of Georgia he has been active and potential in the cause of secession.  He has been called to a post of great importance – one which will serve to display all his merits as a statesman.

C. G. MEMMINGER, SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY

MemmingerThere are few men in the South who are more competent , in point of ability and business capacity, to administer the Department of the Treasury under the Government of the Confederate States than Mr. Memminger.  Possessed of a high order of intellect, a student, learned and full of resources as an accomplished advocate, he is eminently a man of facts and details.

LEROY POPE WALKER, SECRETARY OF WAR

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Hon. Leroy Pope Walker is a lawyer of Huntsville, Alabama, a native of that county (Madison), and about forty-five years of age.  He is the eldest son of the late Major Walker, and one of a family of distinguished for talent and influence. Two of his brothers are Hon. Percy Walker, who recently represented the Mobile District in Congress, and Hon. Judge Richard W. Walker, of Florence, chairman of the Alabama delegation in the present Confederate Congress. Hon. L. P. Walker at one time practiced law in South Alabama, and was for several sessions Speaker of the House of Representatives of the State.  He has been a consistent Democrat of the State rights school.  For the last ten years he has been located in Huntsville, and has the reputation of being the leading lawyer, and, next to Clay, the leading Democrat of North Alabama. Careful in the preparation of his causes, and clear, concise, logical and eloquent in presenting them before court, he is said to be an eminently successful practitioner. For the last three years he has been conspicuous in his denunciation of squatter sovereignty.  In the Alabama Democratic convention, which took ground against it, and sent a delegation to Charleston to carry out her instructed opposition, Mr. Walker’s influence was marked.  He was one of the delegation sent to Charleston, and exerted himself in resisting the compromise offered.

JUDAH P. BENJAMIN, ATTORNEY-GENERAL

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The Hon. J. P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, Attorney-General, is distinguished as one of the profoundest jurists and most accomplished advocates in the the country. He is of the old line of Whig class of State Rights politicians, and his recent speeches in the United States Senate won for him universal admiration. No selection could have been made for Attorney-General of the Confederate States which would be so generally esteemed appropriate.

STEPHEN M. MALLORY, SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

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Mr. Mallory, the Secretary of the Navy of the Confederate States, was for many years a Senator of the United States from Florida, and occupied the important post of the Chairman of the Committee of Naval Affairs.  he took a very active interest in the construction of the new sloops of war, and was largely instrumental in fortifying and improving the harbor of Pensacola- the best in the Gulf. Mr. Mallory’s experience will be of service to the Confederates should they ever have a navy.

JOHN H. REAGAN, POSTMASTER-GENERAL

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Mr. Reagan has never been prominent in national politics, though he served some years in Congress. His functions as Postmaster-General in the Seceded States have thus far been in sinecure, as the mails are still carried by the United States.

JAMES SEDDON, SECRETARY OF WAR

(Replaced Walker)

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Seddon was born in Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia. He was a descendant of William Alexander, Earl of Stirling. Due to frail health, he was educated primarily at home and became self-taught as a youth. At the age of twenty-one, Seddon entered the law school of the University of Virginia, graduating and settling in Richmond, where he established a successful law practice.

In 1845, he was nominated by the Democratic Party for Congress and was easily elected. Two years later, he was renominated, but declined due to platform differences with the party. In 1849, Seddon was reelected to Congress, serving from December 1849 until March 1851. Owing to poor health, he declined another nomination at the end of his term and retired to “Sabot Hill,” his estate on the James River above Richmond.

Seddon attended the peace convention held in Washington, D.C., in 1861, which attempted to devise a means of preventing the impending civil war. Later in the same year, he attended the Provisional Confederate Congress. President Davis named him as the Secretary of War, in 1862 a post he held until January 1, 1865, when he retired from public life to his country estate.

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Rest assured I did not forget the bio’s of Jefferson or Alexander Stephens. Their bios are much to large to place here as this was only a brief overview of the Cabinet of the Confederate States of America. Davis and Stephens will each get their own post for their bios (in the future), so make sure you check back for them.

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